Articles

Why Do Insurance Companies Lay Off Case Managers and How You Can Reduce the Risk

Why Do Insurance Companies Lay Off Case Managers and How You Can Reduce the Risk

But first, you have to get the job!

Insurance companies hire based on the number of contracts they have. If they feel they will win new contracts and need more nurses for CM or UM or other positions, they will post for these positions.

If they get the contract they will hire. If they don’t get the contract they will stop the hiring process immediately. That is why many case managers get through the interview process thinking all went well, only to be told the position is not being filled.

Many of the very large companies that hire work from home case management positions all over the country have smaller “departments” or “lines of business”. So while one may be hiring, another may be laying off because they lost a contract. And while you would think they would just move people from one “department” to another. Often that is not the case, and those laid off will have to “reapply” for other positions.

Understanding the enemy: A curated list of COVID-19 resources for case managers!

Understanding the enemy: A curated list of COVID-19 resources for case managers!

Case managers are struggling. Preliminary results from over 5,900
CCMs in our recent “Checking in With Our CCMs” survey reveals some of the burdens
our case managers carry, and it’s eye-opening.

We’re not that surprised by the results on the professional side. Most case managers
are working remotely (57%) and have limited contact with clients and patients (55%).
Some, however, have been called upon to work on the frontlines. Regardless, many
(40%) are fielding more questions than ever from clients and patients.

Mentorship: Sharing the Knowledge, Supporting Each Other

Mentorship: Sharing the Knowledge, Supporting Each Other

Almost every case manager can point to at least one person who helped them along their professional development journey, and many have, in turn, developed others through mentorship.

Successful mentoring relationships are marked by mutual respect, clear expectations, personal connection, and shared values. In most cases, both mentor and mentee gain from the relationship, and many mentorships translate into lifelong friendships.

Our mentors support us and motivate us, even and especially when the going gets tough. But what if we could find a way to bottle up some of that important advice and those encouraging words and share it to help others? We can!

Case Management Mentor: Be One, Have One

Case Management Mentor: Be One, Have One

Mentoring is more than orientation and preceptorship. These focus on processes and procedures and have their place within an organization, ensuring employees are trained to fulfill their job duties. But mentorship goes beyond policies, procedures, and the “job”. It focuses on the whole person, their “career” as well as work-life balance. 

Mentorship is built on the relationship between the mentor and mentee and has the potential to create leaders. The best mentors see untapped potential in a colleague and help to develop that potential. They will challenge them to go outside of their comfort zone while providing encouragement, support, and direction that guides the mentee to grow into their full potential. 

Commitment, Communication, & Support

Commitment, Communication, & Support

Everyone wants to hire a case manager with experience. Experience is very valuable, but with a large number of case managers reaching retirement age and the demand for case managers increasing, organizations will be forced to hire people who lack previous case management experience. And that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Bringing a fresh set of eyes into a department can have an incredible impact. 

We are going to look at one new case manager who had a major impact on her patients, department, and organization. We will look at the keys to her success and discover how this can be replicated in other organizations. 

Nursing Beyond the Bedside – Utilization Management and Utilization Review

Nursing Beyond the Bedside – Utilization Management and Utilization Review

Utilization Management (UM) is one of the many nontraditional bedside jobs a nurse can pursue. In this article, we will look at what utilization management is and how to move into this position.  Defining Utilization Management and Utilization Review URAC (formerly the Utilization Review Accreditation Commission), a nonprofit organization promoting healthcare quality by accrediting healthcare […]